Archive for September, 2012

October 1st New Maryland Law Will Force Overweight Trucks To Off Load

Friday, September 28th, 2012

October is only a few days away and a New Maryland Law will be in full effect for Truck Drivers. What is this new law? The New Maryland Law revolves around Overweight Vehicles with perishable products.

Starting October 1st, if you are a truck driver carrying an overweight perishable products load, you will automatically be off-loaded.

This change in Maryland law will affect all truck drivers whom exceed the gross vehicle weight limit by more than 5,000 lbs.

Prior to this new Maryland law, overweight vehicles were simply issued a citation rather than being forced to off-load.

Trucks are always more of a hazard when they are overweight and overloaded because the trucks can lose control by making any sudden moves. Here are a few tips on how to prevent overloaded truck accidents:

–      Make sure your commercial truck weight distribution is appropriate. It helps the truck handle itself in a number of circumstances.

–      Know how heavy your load can be, the combined weight of the load and truck and how much weight can each axle endure ( and don’t forget how much weight your truck tires can endure). This will help your truck not be forced to unload at checkpoints and most importantly you can be assured you are safe on the road.

–      Do your best to create distance in front and behind you, so your truck can stop properly and safely when necessary. Too much weight creates an unsafe shift in your load and increases the possibility of you losing control of steering capabilities. Remember big rigs and overloaded trucks are more likely to roll over.

If you have any questions about Safe Truck Loads, please contact Middleton and Meads by calling 410-752-5588 or click here today!

With three locations to serve you throughout Baltimore, Washington DC and Virginia, Middleton and Meads will keep you “on the road.” Our service professionals are experienced and knowledgeable. That is why companies of all sizes depend on us – day in, day out, mile after mile.

We work with you to provide the solutions to your transportation needs!

You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Source: MMTA’s E-News!- New Maryland Law for Overweight Vehicles with Perishable Products Takes Effect October 1st

About I-83 Parking On The Shoulder Citation For Truck Drivers

Saturday, September 22nd, 2012
Just this month, the Maryland State Police announced  they will be aggressively giving out ticketing of trucks parked on the Shoulder of I-83. The fine for parking on the shoulder for trucks is $70.

Truck Drivers that are out of available hours of service cannot be forced to move trucks after the citation is issued.

This new I-83 Parking on The Shoulder policy makes it clear to all truck drivers that they should plan in advance where to park when they need a break.

The ban on parking on the shoulder was made because shoulder parking of trucks leads to extremely dangerous conditions because there’s insufficient truck parking in Maryland. In fact, there are no truck parking facilities along I-83 in Baltimore County. To learn about the I-83 Parking on the Shoulder click here.

If you have any questions about Safe Truck Driving, please contact Middleton and Meads by calling 410-752-5588 or click heretoday!

With three locations to serve you throughout Baltimore, Washington DC and Virginia, Middleton and Meads will keep you “on the road.” Our service professionals are experienced and knowledgeable. That is why companies of all sizes depend on us – day in, day out, mile after mile.

We work with you to provide the solutions to your transportation needs!

You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Source: MMTA’s E-News! –I-83 Parking on the Shoulder

Truck Driving Safety: The Through Truck Ban

Saturday, September 15th, 2012

Truck driving is a challenging and dangerous profession. Every year roughly 600 truck drivers die in highway accidents in the U.S.

The most dangerous types of trucks to drive are rigs such as tankers and flatbeds. About 55 percent of all class 8 driver fatalities happen from a rollover accidents and 10 percent occur from fuel oil fires.

Recently in Maryland there was a fatal crash and explosion of a gasoline tank truck.  Since the fatal crash in August, The Maryland State Police and The Town of Port Deposit have created a Through Truck Ban.

This ban is a plan to aggressively enforce an ordinance designed to prevent trucks from using  the town as a pass through option to avoid I-95 and Route 40 toll plazas.

This ban prohibits trucks over five tons to enter town unless making local deliveries. The sweeping curves on these routes such as Route 222 are located steep hills coming west from I-95 into the town. This is risky territory for trucks because it increases the chances of truck rollovers.

If precautions are taken to reduce the chances of truck rollovers, truck drivers getting killed on the job can be reduced by almost 2/3rds.

Here are some tips on preventing truck rollovers:

1. Try not to drive a tanker with bad suspension  half empty. The tendency for that vehicle to rollover is very high because it takes a truck driver a variety of maneuvers in steering to take full control around corners. If a truck goes around a curve too fast, it will go over.

2. A rollover can happen around a curve without going too fast, if rear tires strike any object while cornering. It can be as simple as a slight hit of a curb. Be mindful of your surroundings.

3. You don’t have to be a bad driver for a rig to rollover. A rig can rollover at speeds as low as 5 mph. This can happen especially on slopes. Do your best not to put a wheel off the pavement or a paved shoulder that has separations. You don’t want to catch or trip a tire. When in doubt, go as slow as possible and go for shallow angles when possible. The more steer you put in, the easier it is to rollover.

4. Always know how your seat belt is set and how to release it in the case of an emergency.

In the majority of truck driving accidents, seat belt can save lives but rollover accidents greater than 90 degrees could impede efforts for drivers to get out alive. During these accidents it’s best to find a way to slip out the shoulder harness or disconnect the belt. Learn where the buckle is at all times and practice reaching for it with your right hand. Teach yourself to quickly release it and pull yourself down with your left hand to get out to safety. Straight and level is key to truck driving safety.

If you have any questions about Safe Truck Driving, please contact Middleton and Meads by calling 410-752-5588 or click here today!

With three locations to serve you throughout Baltimore, Washington DC and Virginia, Middleton and Meads will keep you “on the road.” Our service professionals are experienced and knowledgeable. That is why companies of all sizes depend on us – day in, day out, mile after mile.

We work with you to provide the solutions to your transportation needs!

You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Source: MMTA’s E-News – FREE Commercial Vehicle Safety Summit

Tips for Safe Driving at Night

Wednesday, September 5th, 2012

Traffic deaths are three times more likely to occur than during the day. So, why is night driving so dangerous? Ninety percent of drivers’ reaction time depends on vision which is dependent on light. Fatigue and drowsiness are also factors that are common at night. Alcohol abuse use while driving is more prevalent at night as well.  Fortunately, there are some steps to help protect you and your loved ones at night.

The National Safety Council recommends these steps:

  • Prepare your car for night driving. Keep headlights, tail lights, signal lights and windows (inside and out) clean.
  • Have your headlights properly aimed. Mis-aimed headlights blind other drivers and reduce your ability to see the road.
  • Don’t drink and drive. Not only does alcohol severely impair your driving ability, it also acts as a depressant. Just one drink can induce fatigue.
  • Avoid smoking when you drive. Smoke’s nicotine and carbon monoxide hamper night vision.
  • If there is any doubt, turn your headlights on. Lights will not help you see better in early twilight, but they’ll make it easier for other drivers to see you. Being seen is as important as seeing.
  • Reduce your speed and increase your following distances. It is more difficult to judge other vehicle’s speeds and distances at night.
  • Don’t overdrive your headlights. You should be able to stop inside the illuminated area. If you’re not, you are creating a blind crash area in front of your vehicle.
  • When following another vehicle, keep your headlights on low beams so you don’t blind the driver ahead of you.
  • If an oncoming vehicle doesn’t lower beams from high to low, avoid glare by watching the right edge of the road and using it as a steering guide.
  • Make frequent stops for light snacks and exercise. If you’re too tired to drive, stop and get rest.
  • If you have car trouble, pull off the road as far as possible. Warn approaching traffic at once by setting up reflecting triangles near your vehicle and 300 feet behind it. Turn on flashers and the dome light. Stay off the roadway and get passengers away from the area.

If you have any questions about Safe Night Driving, please contact Middleton and Meads by calling 410-752-5588 or click here today!

With three locations to serve you throughout Baltimore, Washington DC and Virginia, Middleton and Meads will keep you “on the road.” Our service professionals are experienced and knowledgeable. That is why companies of all sizes depend on us – day in, day out, mile after mile.

We work with you to provide the solutions to your transportation needs!

You can follow us on Facebook and Twitter as well!

Sources:

Driving at Night